The Holy Mystery of the Coronation

So they are no longer two, but one
Matthew 19:6

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What is the significance of the mystery of the coronation?

Through the mystery of the coronation, husband and wife, who pledge fidelity and love to one another before the ecclesial communion, are united by the grace of God so that they are no longer two but become one. This is the mystery of the couple's love and willingness to give life and to become fruitful in the procreation of new life. Through this mystery the Church blesses the marriage covenant, the union of man and woman: "Therefore a man will leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two will be one flesh. So they are no longer two, but one" (Matthew 19:5-6).

The Armenian Church expects its members to also get married in a church after the civil marriage, because a marriage is only valid from a church point of view if the mystery of the coronation or marriage ceremony has taken place in the church. The civil marriage and the church coronation must not be equated.

The Church Fathers called the family the “little church”. Like the church, it is a community founded on the foundation of mutual love and common unanimous faith in the triune God. In this sense, the family is in itself a Christian mystery, endured by the grace of the Lord and drawing strength from that grace. Mutual love and faith make husband and wife allies in spirit, inspiring their works, minds and thoughts, leading them to a common goal - union with God in eternal life. “Wonderful is the yoke of two believers,” wrote the Christian writer Tertullian, “having the same hope, living by the same rules, serving the one Lord. They pray together, they fast together, they teach and admonish one another. They are together in church, together at the Lord's supper, together in mourning and persecution, in repentance and joy. They please Christ, and He sends His peace to them. And where there are two in His name, there is no place for evil".

In principle, marriage in the Armenian Church is indissoluble: “But what God has joined, that man must not separate” (Matthew 19:5-6). The promise of the spouses' unconditional love throughout their life together (until death do us part), to help one another and to remain faithful, was also carried over into the marriage service of the Armenian Church. Nonetheless, for pastoral reasons, there are certain strict exceptions that allow remarriage. While the church wedding of remarriages is also a mystery, the wedding service for remarriages is somewhat different than the first wedding. The overriding thought here is repentance.

What is the significance of the mystery of the coronation?

Through the mystery of the coronation, husband and wife, who pledge fidelity and love to one another before the ecclesial communion, are united by the grace of God so that they are no longer two but become one. This is the mystery of the couple's love and willingness to give life and to become fruitful in the procreation of new life. Through this mystery the Church blesses the marriage covenant, the union of man and woman: "Therefore a man will leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two will be one flesh. So they are no longer two, but one" (Matthew 19:5-6).

The Armenian Church expects its members to also get married in a church after the civil marriage, because a marriage is only valid from a church point of view if the mystery of the coronation or marriage ceremony has taken place in the church. The civil marriage and the church coronation must not be equated.

The Church Fathers called the family the “little church”. Like the church, it is a community founded on the foundation of mutual love and common unanimous faith in the triune God. In this sense, the family is in itself a Christian mystery, endured by the grace of the Lord and drawing strength from that grace. Mutual love and faith make husband and wife allies in spirit, quickening their works, minds and thoughts, and leading them toward a common goal—union with God in eternal life. “Wonderful is the yoke of two believers,” wrote the Christian writer Tertullian, “having the same hope, living by the same rules, serving the one Lord. They pray together, they fast together, they teach and admonish one another. They are together in church, together at the Lord's supper, together in mourning and persecution, in repentance and joy. They please Christ, and He sends His peace to them. And where there are two in His name, there is no place for evil".

In principle, marriage in the Armenian Church is indissoluble: “But what God has joined, that man must not separate” (Matthew 19:5-6). The promise of the spouses' unconditional love throughout their life together (until death do us part), to help one another and to remain faithful, was also carried over into the marriage service of the Armenian Church. Nonetheless, for pastoral reasons, there are certain strict exceptions that allow remarriage. While the church wedding of remarriages is also a mystery, the wedding service for remarriages is somewhat different than the first marriage. The overriding thought here is repentance.

THE MARRIAGE

Marriage consists of two parts: engagement and coronation. The mystery of the coronation takes place in a church, before the assembled congregation and in the presence of witnesses. The wedding ceremony may only take place on permitted days. The Mystery will be celebrated by an ordained minister of the Armenian Church. There is no so-called “ecumenical wedding ceremony” in our practice. Mixing the wedding services of the respective churches or double marriages is also not permitted. In the case of a marriage of different denominations (mixed marriage), the participation of a non-Armenian (Roman Catholic, Protestant or Byzantine Orthodox) clergyman is possible after consultation with the bishop.

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Important rules for the wedding ceremony

But at the beginning of creation God made them male and female. Therefore the man will leave his father and mother and the two will become one flesh. So they are no longer two, but one flesh. But what God has joined, man must not separate. Mark 10:6-9

A fundamental prerequisite for marriage is that the partners see each other before the wedding ceremony and that there is mutual affection, love and unity between them. The marriage ceremony should be carried out without coercion and with the consent of those concerned. The Patriarch St. Sahak teaches us: “Advise them (the populace) because they should not promise a boy a girl in marriage and carry out this marriage without the parties having seen each other and without their mutual consent. And you priests, do not bless a boy until he has come of age. And do not perform a marriage ceremony without examining and asking them (those involved) themselves, perhaps they were brought into marriage by parental coercion and against their will; do not be willing to perform such a marriage, for much harm has been done to this day, both mental and physical, by such abuse” (canon 27. This instruction is also found in canon 24 of the Synod of Dwin).

A marriage performed under duress is invalid because the Church teaches that only a relationship built on mutual genuine love can be a lasting committed relationship. The Maschtoz teaches "to become one flesh, spiritually united in humility... holy, pure, united in breath and thought."

The applicable minimum age for marriage depends on the laws of the country and the climatic conditions. Those who are therefore considered to be underage may not enter into marriage. Marriage maturity is at the age of 18.

The bride and groom must be baptized and confirmed. Denominational and national affiliation are important for a harmonious family life.

This means the degree of relationship between the people to be married. The more distant the blood relationship between them, the more canon law is satisfied. This part of the church order was established for reasons of health. As can be read in the 23rd canon of George IV, "because according to physical conditions it (marriage between blood relatives and relatives) is to be considered very injurious to the health of children and their descendants." According to the old Armenian church ordinance, the man must sift degrees of kinship from the woman with whom he intends to marry.

Over the centuries, the church order changed in the question of the degree of blood relationship. In the 1st century, marriages within close relatives, especially among the nobility, were common. This was mainly practiced to keep possessions in the family. In the Synod of Ashtishat, the Patriarch Nerses the Great banned such marriages, although the Synod had not determined the permitted degree of kinship. Only Pavstos of Byzantium mentions the prohibition of marriages between relatives. Nowadays, faced with the new pressures of life, the catholicos George V has reduced the degree of consanguinity from eight to five, between relatives by marriage to four and abolished spiritual kinship.

“We hereby determine and authorize, through our pastoral letter, the conduct of marriages between relatives of the fifth degree and upwards, and between relatives by marriage of the fourth degree and upwards. And in the case of spiritual kinship, such as kinship through sponsorship, we remove every obstacle by allowing the marriage ceremony to be performed between such.” According to the provisions of this pastoral letter of November 11, 1922, the marriage was between relatives by marriage, in other words, one by Relationships created through marriage, not blood relationships, allowed from the fourth degree upwards, and the restriction on spiritual relationships created through godparenthood and the myron oil has been lifted.

The sacrament of marriage must be performed by a clergyman, in the church, and in the presence of the congregation. A marriage performed in secret is invalid. The presence of the officiating minister is essential because, according to the teaching of the Armenian Church, the minister is the mediator through whom grace is bestowed in the administration of all sacraments. The marriage ceremony also requires the execution by a clergyman. A marriage ceremony may also take place at another location if there is no local church or if one of the parties has a serious valid reason for not being able to come or be taken to the church.

  • Weddings are not permitted on any Sunday of the year. Sunday is holy as the Lord's day because the church commemorates the resurrection of Christ. Therefore the Church considers it inappropriate to celebrate a wedding on such a holy day. Nowadays, if a wedding ceremony is to be performed on a Sunday, given the professional circumstances, this must take place in the late afternoon hours, since for the church the new day begins after the daily evening prayer (Vespers).
  • Every Wednesday and Friday is not married, as these are considered days of fasting. Exceptions to this are the Wednesdays and Fridays between New Sunday (the first Sunday after Easter) and Ascension Day. According to the provisions of the Catholicos George V, these are not days of fasting, and therefore marriage ceremonies can be performed on these days.
  • Weddings are not celebrated on Christmas Day, Jesus' Name Day, the Presentation of Christ in the Temple, the Day of the Annunciation to Mary, and the Ascension Day.
  • It is inappropriate to hold weddings and celebrations throughout Great Lent and the first eight days after Easter, as these days are considered days of penance and mourning. St. Nerses Schnorhali writes in his "General Epistle": "For the forty days of fasting are days of mourning and gloom and commemoration of the passion of Christ, - and not days of drunkenness and nuptial joy". This time frame, which originally lasted until Pentecost, was shortened by the Catholicos George V to the above-mentioned time frame of Great Lent to New Sunday (see canon of the 5th Synod of Dwin and "General Epistle").

MARRIAGE PREPARATION

How does one become part of the Church, who can be baptized in the Armenian Apostolic Church, what does conversion from another Christian community mean and what is re-entry? You can find answers to these questions in this section.

In our prayer books the meaning of betrothal is explained as follows: “Betrothal is the beginning of marriage; because, for example, the tree blossoms first and then it bears fruit, so the bridegroom and the bride blossom first through the engagement and then through the wedding ceremony, they bear fruit. According to the church order, the priest is obliged to examine the bridegroom and the bride to ensure that they have no spiritual or blood relationship. Nor must he marry a young girl with an old man, or a boy with an old woman. The groom should be at least 18 years old and the bride 15 or 16 years old. He should sit them side by side on the chair, - and not in a heathen way in secret. As a sign of engagement, a ring, a bracelet, an earring and a red net are to be placed in front of the groom, and a veil is to be placed on the bride. The ring is placed on her fourth finger, which has the vein to the heart, and shows that the bride loves the groom with all her heart. The bracelet on the wrist shows that the bride obediently binds herself to the man of her own will, the earring - that she has heard with her ears and with her mind (and heart) agrees. The earring and ring are all that expresses the agreement of the heart and will. The red net and veil express that she truly becomes the bride of the boy to whom she becomes engaged. The priest stands and explains the sacrament of the betrothal, that this is not a novelty but the life-giving sacrament announced by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary (Great Book of Prayer).

At the end of the engagement ceremony, the priest gives a teaching "as at a wedding". According to this section, this instruction is established. Then the priest sings the hymn "In the Sign of Thy Cross Almighty", reads the relevant passages from the Gospel and the prayers. He blesses the rings and places them on the ring finger of the right hand of the bride and groom. He also blesses the bracelet and earrings and puts them on the bride's arm and ear. In some regions, the bride gives the groom a belt, which the priest also blesses and puts on the groom. Finally, the officiating priest gives the blessing and sends the congregation in peace.

Although the tradition of the separate church engagement is partly preserved, this ceremony is performed in connection with the wedding ceremony in the church. However, this custom is still practiced in some places.

The day before the wedding, the priest hears the confessions of the groom and the bride individually. Then he gives them Holy Communion. If the wedding ceremony takes place during a mass, the newlyweds are given communion while singing the hymn “Christ is sacrificed”.

During the marriage ceremony, the groom stands on the north side of the church with the bride on his right, "the queen stands on your right" (Psalm 45:10). The godfather and the male attendants of the bride and groom stand at the groom's side and the women at the bride's side. In the vestibule of the altar, the officiating priest blesses the engagement rings and places them on the left ring finger of the groom and bride. In the prayer that follows, he asks God to bless “the male and female servants” and lead them “to good works”.

Handshake Ceremony

This ceremony is a public promise, an agreement between the bridegroom and the bride, made in the church before God in the presence of the congregation. The officiating priest first reads the instruction, then he asks the groom and the bride the same question, whether they will submit to one another and care for one another. After the question is answered in the affirmative, the shaking of hands takes place, in which the priest clasps the right hands of the bride and groom and says “When God took the hand of Eve”. The handshake is based on the biblical tradition that after God created Eve, he gave her to Adam and united and blessed them both. Thus the priest, as the ambassador of Christ, hands over the bride to the bridegroom, unites them both and blesses them.

After the prayer "When God Took the Hand of Eve", the priest twists the thread for the bridegroom's headband and recites the words of the Psalm 21:2: “Lord, the king rejoices in your power; he rejoices loudly at your help!” Then he twists the yarn for the bride’s headband and says: “She is led to the king in colorfully embroidered clothes, virgins are her attendants, her friends are brought to you” (Psalm 45:15). He places the ribbons on the bride and groom's shoulders.

The newlyweds are led in front of the bema (the stage on which the altar is located) to the accompaniment of the hymn “Rejoice, O Holy Church”, while the priest and the deacons appear in front of the altar. On the altar, the priest lifts the gospel and lets the bridal couple kiss it. The deacon reads the readings determined by the marriage order, a passage from the Gospel, and the creed. This is followed by the reading of a long prayer explaining the sacrament of marriage. During the prayer, the bride and groom turn to the altar.

The officiating priest blesses the crowns (or the headbands twined in the vestibule of the altar) and places one on the groom's head first, then the other on the bride's head. The deacon hands the godparents standing behind the bride and groom a cross, which he holds between their heads.
This section is followed by the hymn "O thou blissful one," with the bride and groom seated but the godfather and other attendants standing, as a token of honor like a king and queen. Here the terms "king" and "queen" are to be understood in a spiritual sense. Through the church blessing, the bridal couple is strengthened with spiritual grace, like the first Armenian kings Abgar and Tiritades, as well as his wife Ashkhen, who received the heavenly crown of Christ through their conversion to Christianity during their earthly reign and were thus given the honor of to enter as saints into the everlasting kingdom of God.

Kings and clergy alike had an obligation to defend the faith and to ensure the permanence of the faith of their citizens. Similar to a family relationship, the parents have the leadership and are obligated to impart the divine graces they have received to their children so that they may grow in faith and keep those graces. In this sense, too, the married couple is called to work in the spiritual field. In the above hymn, "O thou most blessed," Kings Abgar and Tiritadis, who were the first defenders of the Christian faith, are asked to intercede with God that the newly-wed couple may remain strong and steadfast in their faith.

Then the ceremony begins, in which the crowns or headbands (narod) are removed. After the large prayer book, the deacon reads a teaching with the godfather holding the cross over the heads of the bridal couple. The officiating priest removes the headbands and continues the prayer with the words: "...send your angel of peace to come and keep them..." The godfather also takes down the cross. The bride and groom turn to the altar.

The process of this ceremony has changed over the centuries. It was originally held outside the church. After the wedding ceremony, the bride was led to the bridegroom's house on horseback, accompanied by sacred and folk songs. A day or a week after the wedding ceremony, depending on local tradition, the priest would visit the couple in the bridal room and remove their headbands in prayer. Up until that point, the couple had been forbidden from any physical relationship.

After the ceremony of removing the headband, the wine is blessed. The deacon pours the wine into a cup, which the priest blesses and gives to the groom and then to the bride to drink. The cup is then presented to the close relatives of the newlyweds. The blessing and distribution of the wine commemorates the wedding at Cana, where Christ turned the water into wine and gave it to the host to distribute to the other guests. By this miracle, Christ blessed that marriage and shared in the joy He brought to the wedding guests.
Wine has always been a sign of joy and praise, as the Marriage at Cana shows us. In this context, however, the wine is also the symbolization of the Holy Spirit, who gives life. The Holy Spirit is the real meaning of life, the source of knowledge, happiness and vitality. By drinking the wine, the bride and groom accept the Holy Spirit, which stimulates and guides future family life.
The sacrament of marriage ends with the prayer "Christ our God, guardian and hope of the faithful", the Lord's Prayer, the blessing and the dismissal.

The post-marriage ceremony also has a biblical basis. In Genesis 21:8 we read that when Isaac was weaned, the patriarch gave Abraham a great feast. King David also prepared a feast in honor of Abner and his companions (2 Samuel 3:20). When his prodigal son returned, in Luke 15:22-24 the father throws a big feast. The marriage at Cana also expresses such joy. So the tradition of holding a celebration after weddings or baptisms and similar happy events has been preserved through the centuries. Nevertheless, such occasions, when the gifts of God are distributed to many, should not become an occasion for exaggeration and scandal. The command of God should always be kept in mind: “So whether you eat or drink or do anything else, do everything for the glory of God. Give neither Jews, nor Greeks, nor the Church of God cause for reproach!" (1 Corinthians 10:31-32).

Unfortunately, it must be said that today's celebrations are far removed from the commandment of the above-mentioned gospel. In some cases they become the subject of boasting and boasting, spending thousands on hall rentals, banquets, bands and singers. In contrast, people haggle over the church fees, which are already quite low, or even threaten to ask other churches where the ceremonies are carried out free of charge. There are also people who, despite their weak financial situation, compete with the wealthy and finance their celebrations with loans. All of this, however, bears no relation to the joy of a holy marriage and misses its true meaning. The purpose of such festivals is to celebrate within the framework of religious and folk traditions in the community of family members. Such a celebration can also take place in a modest setting, the important thing being holiness and sincerity. The celebrations that follow a baptism are particularly striking. These celebrations have now become so lavish that they resemble a competition between families. The parents of the baptized are so occupied with their guests and the fun that the focus of the day (the baptized) falls into oblivion. It is observed with astonishment with what emphasis the child is put to sleep so that the parents will not be late to attend the celebration. Many of the guests leave the celebration without even having seen the baptized. The actual meaning of the celebration is to rejoice with the baptized child that the Christian church has gained a new member. The celebration should also be designed with this in mind.

But let's go back to the wedding party. It is proper for a clergyman to bless the banquet table, who also extends his congratulations to the newlywed couple and to the guests. It is also important that at the celebration the bride and groom go to the guests and thank them and accept their congratulations for starting a family and doing a good deed.

[Armenian: Khachjeghpayr (cross brother)]

The best man is the one who holds the cross at the wedding ceremony. He is often referred to as "Godfather" as at baptism. In the ancient Armenian tradition, the godfather was a person who was either godfather of one of the spouses or godfather of one of the parents, therefore he is called godfather. He is the official witness at the wedding ceremony.

The godfather must be baptized in the Armenian Apostolic Church and currently a member of the Eucharist. He is not only a witness, but also a guarantor that the married couple will remain faithful to the Armenian Church and lead their lives according to the sacred tradition of the Church. It should therefore be someone with a firm Christian faith so that he can offer advice to the young family.

Nowadays it is also common to appoint people who do not belong to the Armenian Orthodox denomination as godparents. Personal interests are often the motive for such a decision, such as the desire to build up a relationship through marriage in order to obtain a possible right of residence in a country. Such considerations are contrary to church traditions and church teaching. It is incomprehensible how people belonging to another denomination can be expected to provide religious assistance to an Armenian family. Conversely, it is just as difficult to expect an Armenian to be the godfather of a person from another denomination.

Nevertheless, the Christian churches have developed an upright relationship with one another on the ecumenical level and are trying to break down the sectarian barriers that separate them. In this spirit of Christian brotherhood, the questions of sponsorship and interdenominational marriages should also be dealt with. Nevertheless, in such cases, the person concerned should at least be informed about the history and traditions of the Armenian Church, so that the purpose of a godparent as a supporter of the family is satisfied. Professing atheists should not be considered as possible godparents, because they could give rise to family breakdowns and even be a stumbling block.

Preparation for the wedding

The Holy Mysteries of the Church

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